Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a chronic and progressive movement disorder that affects approximately one million people in the United States. The disease is characterized by a loss of neurons in the substantia nigra, the area of the brain where dopamine is produced. Dopamine production and synthesis is necessary for coordination and movement. As Parkinson’s progresses, dopamine production steadily decreases resulting in tremor, slowed movement (bradykinesia), impaired posture and balance, and speech and writing problems. There is no present cure for Parkinson’s; disease and management consists of controlling the motor symptoms primarily through administration of levodopa therapies. While this improves the control of Parkinson’s symptoms, the disease progresses and the beneficial effects of levodopa begin to wear off, symptoms worsen and patients experience end-of-dose motor fluctuations. These end of dose motor fluctuations are improved with the addition of a COMT inhibitor to levodopa.

In June 2016, the European Commission authorized ONGENTYS® (opicapone) as an adjunct therapy to preparations of levodopa/DOPA decarboxylase inhibitors (DDCIs) in adult patients with Parkinson’s disease and end-of-dose motor fluctuations who cannot be stabilized on those combinations. This approval was based on data from a clinical development program that included 28 clinical studies of more than 900 patients treated with opicapone in 30 countries worldwide. ONGENTYS has not been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration.